HR Alert

Arizona Adopts Earned Paid Sick Time Law

New Law Effective July 1, 2017

Effective July 1, 2017, a new law in Arizona requires most private employers to offer paid sick time to eligible employees.

Paid Sick Time Provided for Employee and Family Member Illnesses
Under the new law, a covered employee may use earned paid sick time for the following:

  • An employee's mental or physical illness, injury or health condition; an employee's need for medical diagnosis, care, or treatment of a mental or physical illness, injury or health condition, and an employee's need for preventive medical care.
  • Care of a family member with a mental or physical illness, injury or health condition; care of a family member who needs medical diagnosis, care, or treatment of a mental or physical illness, injury or health condition, and care for a family member who needs preventive medical care.
  • Certain absences necessary due to domestic violence, sexual violence, abuse or stalking.

Accrual of Leave
Paid sick time begins to accrue at the commencement of employment or on July 1, 2017, whichever is later. Generally, an employee may use earned paid sick time as it is accrued. An employer may require an employee hired after July 1, 2017 to wait until the 90th calendar day after commencing employment before using accrued earned paid sick leave. The maximum amount of yearly paid sick time, to which an employee is entitled, depends on employer size, as follows:

  • An employee's mental or physical illness, injury or health condition; an employee's need for medical diagnosis, care, or treatment of a mental or physical illness, injury or health condition, and an employee's need for preventive medical care.
  • Care of a family member with a mental or physical illness, injury or health condition; care of a family member who needs medical diagnosis, care, or treatment of a mental or physical illness, injury or health condition, and care for a family member who needs preventive medical care.
  • Certain absences necessary due to domestic violence, sexual violence, abuse or stalking.

The law does not require financial or other reimbursement to an employee from an employer upon his or her termination, resignation, retirement, or other separation from employment for accrued earned paid sick time that has not been used.

Click here to view the text of the new law, which includes, among other things, information about notice, recordkeeping and confidentiality.


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